Language and Culture

Language and Culture

 

The Department of Language and Culture is divided into three majors, each of which has several disciplines as follows:

Japan and East Asian Languages and Culture:

Japanese Language and Literature, Chinese Language and Literature

English and European Languages and Culture:

English Literature, American Literature, US-Japan Comparative Literature, English Language and Linguistics, German Culture, and French Culture

Creation and Understanding Culture:

Philosophy, Art History, Cultural Exchange

Each major offers systematic and dedicated instruction.

Japan and East Asian Languages and Culture

The Japan and East Asian Languages and Culture course consists of two disciplines: Japanese Language and Literature, and Chinese Language and Literature. Emphasis is placed on theoretical studies as well as skills in expressing oneself and reading while dealing with the bilateral dilemmas between China and Japan as well.
Students who have been admitted to the course and who have selected one of these two disciplines are required to study some common basic subjects. Lectures are given in small classes and often proceed in the form of discussion based upon the students' oral presentations.

English and European Languages and Culture

English Language and Culture consists of four fields: English Literature, American Literature, Comparative Literature, and English Language and Linguistics. These disciplines help develop understanding and appreciation of the English language, literature and culture.
Students and teachers enjoy campus life in an international atmosphere. There is a native English speaker on staff, and we offer foreign exchange programs to study at universities in the US.
European Language and Culture is divided into two disciplines, German Culture and French Culture. These disciplines help develop understanding and appreciation of European culture.
While learning German or French, students can enjoy foreign exchange programs.

Creation and Understanding Culture

Most of us have cellphones. If you don't, you wouldn't say you are living alone without having communication with others. Cellular phones are one of the handiest tools we use for communication. Without communication, we as social human beings cannot live. Some take to words, others to works of art for a channel of communication. "What is it that we understand each other by words or by works of art?" "Is an understanding possible?" Those are the underlying questions we follow in the course of our study in philosophy and the science of art.